Hey Everyone!!

This past Thursday, Jake from 1 North hosted an event where we walked to Otts Hall and went on the roof with Professor Katie Rabidoux. We used tools to help us find consolations, and she brought up her telescope to look at the moon! We all had a great time! Here are just some quick NASA facts about the moon!

Out of Shape

The moon is not round, but is in fact egg-shaped with the large end pointed towards Earth.

Heavyweight

Total weight: of the moon is 74 sextillion km (that’s 81 quintillion tons).

Stuffed Crust

The crust on the far side of the moon is thicker than the crust on the near side.

The far side highlands appear to have formed early in the moon’s history, when a magma ocean (shaped by tides caused by Earth’s gravity) heated the moon’s floating crust non-uniformly. Since then, the magma ocean has solidified.

Original Rocks

The rocks of the terrae (the light colored, rugged highlands of the moon) are nearly 4.6 billion years old.

Moon Dust

The moon’s surface is covered by a pile of rock fragments and dust called lunar regolith. The thickness of the regolith varies from about 5 m on mare surfaces to about 10 m on highland surfaces.

Hot Rocks

All moon rocks originated through high-temperature processes with little or no involvement with water.

Who’s the Bunny Girl on the Moon?

Apollo 11 Buzz Aldrin to Mission Control, “Okay. We’ll keep a close eye out for the bunny girl.”

Weightless? Not Quite

Gravity on the moon is only 1/6 of that found on Earth.

Earthrise

Seeing the Earth rise from the moon never gets old.

Moonquakes

There are two types of earthquakes that happen on the moon: deep moonquakes and shallow moonquakes.

Lunar Celebration

The ancient Chinese greeted solar eclipses by using noisemakers and by shooting arrows toward the heavens.

Is There an Atmosphere on the Moon?

Relative to Earth, the moon is highly depleted in iron and in volatile elements that are needed to form atmospheric gases and water. However, there is an atmosphere.

Even Dozen

Only 12 people have ever walked on the surface of the moon.

Don’t Forget Your Space Suit

The moon is 239,000 miles away from the Earth. It would take almost nine years to walk there.

Inverted Moon

As the astronomical telescope with its inverted image came into use, astronomers adopted the habit of representing the way they saw the moon — upside down. This practice was followed until very recently. Lunar images are now constructed and stored digitally and can be displayed at any orientation. The moon is now typically shown right side up.

Snow Moon

Native Americans referred to February’s full moon as “Snow Moon.” This is due to the cold and snowy weather typically found during the month of February.

Lunar Mascons

Mass is not distributed uniformly inside the moon. Large mass concentrations (“mascons”) lie beneath the surface of many large lunar basins and probably represent thick accumulations of dense lava. Relative to its geometric center, the moon’s center of mass is displaced toward Earth by several kilometers.

Tiny Temblors

“Moonquakes” are millions of times less powerful than earthquakes.

Moon Day

A lunar day (or the time it takes from sunrise to sunrise) on the moon is approximately 708 hours.

Moon Rocks

Between 1969 and 1972 six Apollo missions brought back 382 kg (842 pounds) of lunar rocks, core samples, pebbles, sand and dust from the lunar surface. In addition, three automated Soviet spacecraft returned important samples totaling 300 g (approximately 3/4 pound).

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