Weekly Band and Challenge — December 8, 2015

Weekly Band and Challenge

Hey all!

This week’s band is Red Hot Chili Peppers!

Red Hot Chili Peppers (also sometimes shortened to “The Chili Peppers” or abbreviated as “RHCP“) are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles in 1983. The group’s musical style primarily consists of rock with an emphasis on funk, as well as elements from other genres such as punk rock and psychedelic rock. When played live, their music incorporates elements of jam band due to the improvised nature of much of their performances. Currently, the band consists of founding members Anthony Kiedis (vocals) and Flea(bass), longtime drummer Chad Smith, and guitarist Josh Klinghoffer, who joined in late 2009, replacing John Frusciante. Red Hot Chili Peppers have won seven Grammy Awards, and have become one of the best-selling bands of all time, selling over 80 million records worldwide.[1] In 2012, they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

https://www.youtube.com/user/RHCPtv

This week’s challenge is to get at least 8 hours of total rest!

1 Keep your figure

Watching your weight can be as simple as getting a good night’s sleep. Lack of sleep can make you put on weight by drastically slowing your metabolism down, according to a study by scientists at Uppsala University in Sweden. The researchers suggested getting plenty of sleep might prevent weight gain.

2 You can concentrate better

We have all woken up after a good night’s sleep ready to take on the world. But IKEA’s Slumber Survey found one in three Australians rate their sleep as ‘poor’ to ‘terrible’. A bad night’s sleep can leave you struggling all day. More than half of us will have problems concentrating after sleeping badly, according to a survey by shopping channel QVC.

3 You’ll be in a great mood

Nearly two thirds of people blame lack of sleep when they feel irritable, according to the QVC survey.
IKEA spokesman Angela McCann says: “It’s unsurprising only 1% of those asked in the Slumber Survey claim to feel fantastic when they wake up. The lack of sleep and the ensuing tiredness is likely impacting on people’s judgment, problem-solving and creativity.”

4 You’ll look more attractive

Regular shut-eye actually makes you look healthier and more attractive, according to a 2010 study published in the British Medical Journal. Researchers photographed 23 people after a period of sleep deprivation and after a normal night’s sleep of eight hours. The photos were shown to 65 people who rated each photo based on health attractiveness and tiredness. The sleep deprived group scored lower in all three categories.

5 Ability to make better informed decisions

We’ve all heard of sleeping on a problem, in the hope that come morning the solution will be clear. Well scientists have found that when you do this your brain still looks for a solution, even when you’re asleep. Even if you don’t wake up with an answer, a good night’s sleep will equip your brain to assess the problem afresh.

6 You’ll live longer

Regularly sleeping less than you should is associated with a shorter lifespan, although it is not clear whether little sleep is the cause, or an effect of other illnesses. Studies have found people who routinely sleep for fewer than six hours a night have a higher risk of dying sooner than people of a similar age who sleep for seven or eight hours a night.

7 You’ll be a winner

Getting extra sleep can even improve athletic performance. Five swimmers were monitored as part of a study in 2008, they extended their sleep to 10 hours a day for six to seven weeks. At the end of the study the athletes could swim faster and react more quickly. With Australians sleeping for seven hours each night on average, according to IKEA’s Slumber Survey, three more hours in bed could make us quicker and sharper.

8 You’re less likely to get ill

Lack of sleep can suppress your immune system, which makes you more vulnerable to infections. A study in 2009 found that sleeping for fewer than seven hours a night increased the risk of catching a cold. The team from Carnegie Mellon University found the risk was trebled compared with those who slept for eight hours or more a night.

9 You’ll remember things clearly

During deep sleep the brain goes through our impressions of the day in a process vital to memory formation. A study published in the journal Sleep found people who slept fewer than six hours a night for two weeks scored far worse on memory tests than those who slept eight hours.

This Week’s Band and Challenge! — November 8, 2015

This Week’s Band and Challenge!

Hey guys!

This week is Queen! Queen are a British rock band formed in London in 1970. They originally consisted of Freddie Mercury (lead vocals, piano), Brian May (guitar, vocals), John Deacon (bass guitar), and Roger Taylor (drums, vocals). Queen’s earliest works were influenced by progressive rock, hard rock and heavy metal, but the band gradually ventured into more conventional and radio-friendly works by incorporating further styles, such as arena rock and pop rock, into their music.

Here is a link to their best hits album!

This week’s challenge is to read an entire book! Here are some benefits to reading everyday!

When was the last time you read a book, or a substantial magazine article? Do your daily reading habits center around tweets, Facebook updates, or the directions on your instant oatmeal packet? If you’re one of countless people who don’t make a habit of reading regularly, you might be missing out: reading has a significant number of benefits, and just a few benefits of reading are listed below.

1. Mental Stimulation

Studies have shown that staying mentally stimulated can slow the progress of (or possibly even prevent) Alzheimer’s and Dementia, since keeping your brain active and engaged prevents it from losing power. Just like any other muscle in the body, the brain requires exercise to keep it strong and healthy, so the phrase “use it or lose it” is particularly apt when it comes to your mind. Doing puzzles and playing games such as chess have also been found to be helpful with cognitive stimulation.

2. Stress Reduction

No matter how much stress you have at work, in your personal relationships, or countless other issues faced in daily life, it all just slips away when you lose yourself in a great story. A well-written novel can transport you to other realms, while an engaging article will distract you and keep you in the present moment, letting tensions drain away and allowing you to relax.

3. Knowledge

Everything you read fills your head with new bits of information, and you never know when it might come in handy. The more knowledge you have, the better-equipped you are to tackle any challenge you’ll ever face.

Additionally, here’s a bit of food for thought: should you ever find yourself in dire circumstances, remember that although you might lose everything else—your job, your possessions, your money, even your health—knowledge can never be taken from you.

4. Vocabulary Expansion

This goes with the above topic: the more you read, the more words you gain exposure to, and they’ll inevitably make their way into your everyday vocabulary. Being articulate and well-spoken is of great help in any profession, and knowing that you can speak to higher-ups with self-confidence can be an enormous boost to your self-esteem. It could even aid in your career, as those who are well-read, well-spoken, and knowledgeable on a variety of topics tend to get promotions more quickly (and more often) than those with smaller vocabularies and lack of awareness of literature, scientific breakthroughs, and global events.

Reading books is also vital for learning new languages, as non-native speakers gain exposure to words used in context, which will ameliorate their own speaking and writing fluency.

5. Memory Improvement

When you read a book, you have to remember an assortment of characters, their backgrounds, ambitions, history, and nuances, as well as the various arcs and sub-plots that weave their way through every story. That’s a fair bit to remember, but brains are marvellous things and can remember these things with relative ease. Amazingly enough, every new memory you create forges new synapses (brain pathways)and strengthens existing ones, which assists in short-term memory recall as well as stabilizing moods. How cool is that?

6. Stronger Analytical Thinking Skills

Have you ever read an amazing mystery novel, and solved the mystery yourself before finishing the book? If so, you were able to put critical and analytical thinking to work by taking note of all the details provided and sorting them out to determine “whodunnit”.

That same ability to analyze details also comes in handy when it comes to critiquing the plot; determining whether it was a well-written piece, if the characters were properly developed, if the storyline ran smoothly, etc. Should you ever have an opportunity to discuss the book with others, you’ll be able to state your opinions clearly, as you’ve taken the time to really consider all the aspects involved.

7. Improved Focus and Concentration

In our internet-crazed world, attention is drawn in a million different directions at once as we multi-task through every day. In a single 5-minute span, the average person will divide their time between working on a task, checking email, chatting with a couple of people (via gchat, skype, etc.), keeping an eye on twitter, monitoring their smartphone, and interacting with co-workers. This type of ADD-like behaviour causes stress levels to rise, and lowers our productivity.

When you read a book, all of your attention is focused on the story—the rest of the world just falls away, and you can immerse yourself in every fine detail you’re absorbing. Try reading for 15-20 minutes before work (i.e. on your morning commute, if you take public transit), and you’ll be surprised at how much more focused you are once you get to the office.

8. Better Writing Skills

This goes hand-in-hand with the expansion of your vocabulary: exposure to published, well-written work has a noted effect on one’s own writing, as observing the cadence, fluidity, and writing styles of other authors will invariably influence your own work. In the same way that musicians influence one another, and painters use techniques established by previous masters, so do writers learn how to craft prose by reading the works of others.

9. Tranquility

In addition to the relaxation that accompanies reading a good book, it’s possible that the subject you read about can bring about immense inner peace and tranquility. Reading spiritual texts can lower blood pressure and bring about an immense sense of calm, while reading self-help books has been shown to help people suffering from certain mood disorders and mild mental illnesses.

10. Free Entertainment

Though many of us like to buy books so we can annotate them and dog-ear pages for future reference, they can be quite pricey. For low-budget entertainment, you can visit your local library and bask in the glory of the countless tomes available there for free. Libraries have books on every subject imaginable, and since they rotate their stock and constantly get new books, you’ll never run out of reading materials.

If you happen to live in an area that doesn’t have a local library, or if you’re mobility-impaired and can’t get to one easily, most libraries have their books available in PDF or ePub format so you can read them on your e-reader, iPad, or your computer screen. There are also many sources online where you can download free e-books, so go hunting for something new to read!

There’s a reading genre for every literate person on the planet, and whether your tastes lie in classical literature, poetry, fashion magazines, biographies, religious texts, young adult books, self-help guides, street lit, or romance novels, there’s something out there to capture your curiosity and imagination. Step away from your computer for a little while, crack open a book, and replenish your soul for a little while.

This Weeks Band and Challenge! — November 3, 2015

This Weeks Band and Challenge!

Hey all!

Enjoy the last bit of beautiful weather! This week’s challenge is to play a game of Frisbee Golf with your friends! Send me your scores and I will post the winner!

This week’s featured band is “Creedence Clearwater Revival”. You can never go wrong with the classics! Here is a link to their Greatest Hits!

Creedence Clearwater Revival (often shortened to “Creedence” or “CCR”) was an American rock band active in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The band consisted of lead vocalist, lead guitarist, and primary songwriter John Fogerty, rhythm guitarist Tom Fogerty, bassist Stu Cookand drummer Doug Clifford. Their musical style encompassed the roots rockswamp rock, and blues rock genres. Despite their San Francisco Bay Area origins, they portrayed a Southern rock style, with lyrics about bayous, catfish, the Mississippi River, and other popular elements of Southern US iconography, as well as political and socially-conscious lyrics about topics including the Vietnam War.

This week’s Music and Challenge! — October 17, 2015

This week’s Music and Challenge!

Hey all! This week’s band is “Bad Suns” and here a link to their youtube!

Here’s a little about Bad Suns!

Los Angeles natives, Bad Suns, are pleased to announce the release of their debut album, Language & Perspective. Comprised of eleven tracks, Language & Perspective moves effortlessly from start to finish showcasing the band’s stadium ready anthems and undeniably catchy hooks. The album will be available on iTunes on June 24th and everywhere else July 1st, but fans can preorder on iTunes today and receive three instant-grat tracks, ‘Cardiac Arrest,’ ‘Transpose,’ and ‘Salt’: http://smarturl.it/languageperspective.

Produced by Eric Palmquist (The Mars Volta, Wavves, Trash Talk) Language & Perspective serves as a follow up to the band’s breakout debut EP Transpose, which hit streets earlier this year. In a short time since their inception, Bad Suns have performed the first single, ‘Cardiac Arrest,’ on Conan and the track is already fast approaching Top 20 at Alt Radio with a weekly audience of 1 million plus and building. Watch the Conan performance here: http://youtu.be/seNFqYvl_OA.

“It’s pretty incredible what you can accomplish with time, work, and patience. Playing our songs to receptive audiences, across the country, has been surreal for us; it’s what we’ve always dreamed of. We’re excited for people to hear the album that we’ve made, and then come experience it in a live setting,” says frontman Christo Bowman. Bad Suns is currently on tour directly supporting The 1975 until the beginning of June when they kick off a run of headlining shows in the US. 


This week’s challenge is run a mile everyday!

There’s no doubt that running a mile each day is a step in the right direction toward overall health. If you’re looking to lose weight, running is one of the most efficient — and cheapest — ways to burn calories. On top of that, it’s a great way to improve your cardiovascular health and build muscle. If you’re thinking of including a one-mile run in your daily exercise routine, knowing some of the basic facts about speed and calories burned can help you tailor your workout to meet your fitness goals.

Exercise Guidelines

The U.S. Department of Health advises adults to get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise each week, for an average of about 21 minutes a day. If you’re exercising vigorously, the recommendations are at least 75 minutes a week — or about 10 minutes a day. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, jogging or running is considered a vigorous exercise.

Pacing

A slow pace for a one-mile run is 13 minutes, researchers from the University of Wisconsin say. Men’s optimal speed, meanwhile, is about a 7-minute mile, and women’s is about 9 minutes. Tie the speed estimate together with the recommended daily exercise guidelines, and you’ll see that for slower runners, running one mile a day can meet the daily recommended dose of exercise. If you’re running faster, you may need to add in more mileage or additional physical activities to meet that time guideline.

Calories Burned

Any time you exercise, you’re going to be burning calories, but the speed at which you run — and your own weight — can affect the number of calories you’ll burn. According to MayoClinic.com, running at a speed of 5 miles per hour — slightly more than that 13-minute mile — will burn about 606 calories per hour for a 160-pound person, and 905 calories per hour for a 240-pound person. Running at a speed of 8 mph — roughly a 7-minute mile — can burn about 861 calories for a 160-pound person, and 1,286 calories for someone who weighs 240 pounds.

Perfect Pace

According to research on the evolution of human running published in the “Journal of Human Evolution” in 2007, reaching your optimal running pace means you’ll be using the least amount of oxygen to get from A to B. When you run faster, your metabolic rate is faster — meaning more calories burned. To ramp up your speed, try varying your running pace. The One Mile Runner recommends doing interval sets to increase your speed. Try breaking your one-mile run into eight sets of sprints, or running four sets of 1/4 mile at slightly less than your sprint speed to increase your speed and efficiency

This Weeks Band and Challenge! — September 28, 2015
This week’s Band and Challenge! — September 21, 2015
New Band of the Week and Challenge! — September 17, 2015
New Band and Challenge of the Week! — September 5, 2015
Hugunin Hall 2North

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Hugunin Hall 2North

Welcome 2 Northers!

Hugunin Hall Ground Floor

WE'RE SO GROUNDED!

Hugunin Hall 1st North

Together We Succeed

1 South

A way to stay connected to Hugunin's 1 South wing community.

Hugunin Hall 2 South

The 2 South Lovely Ladies

Hugunin Hall 4 South

Welcome Pioneers!